discipline myths part 2

This is part 2 of a 3-part series. For part 1, click here.

2. MY CHILD IS GOOD. HE DOESN’T NEED DISCIPLINE.

That’s what I thought too. My first baby looked so angelic I didn’t think he could do anything wrong. The first few months, all he did was eat and sleep and coo and make us smile even when he was asleep. He was such an adorable baby! He was the easiest, happiest baby I’ve seen. But when he started walking and talking, he learned to assert his will and insist on what he wanted. One such incident was when i told him to stay away from the electric fan. Inspite of my warnings, he was so mesmerized by it he decided to stick his little finger inside while it was running. Until now, his finger bears the scar of his foolishness.

Image and video hosting by TinyPicI remember when Janina was 2 years old, everyday I would give her chewable vitamins. I thought she loved it because everytime I put it in her mouth, she would give me a smile and walk away happily. One day when I was cleaning her room, I looked under her bed to check for toys that were left there, and to my surprise, I found a tiny pile of moist, sticky chewable vitamins. I realized that everytime I would give her a tablet, she would rush to her room, take it out of her mouth and hide it under her bed. How could my sweet 2-year old princess do that to me? Where did she learn to deceive her own mother like that?

I could go on and on with my stories. There is no denying it. Our children have the sinful nature. Well, our kids will always be adorable to us no matter what, but even with the cuteness factor, they are still sinners.

Prov.22:15 says “Folly is bound up in the heart of a child, but the rod of discipline will drive it far from him.” The bad news is no one is exempt. Even your easy, good-natured, happy baby has foolishness in his heart. It’s only a matter of time that this foolishness will manifest itself. The good news is, God has given us the tool to drive that foolishness out of their hearts: discipline.  The sooner we recognize that folly, the sooner we can drive it away.

Practical tips:

1. Whenever you see foolishness, or willful disobedience, always discipline them for it. Consistency is the key. The challenge is when we are tired, because we normally just let them get away with it. At the same time, you also need to consistently praise them and reinforce obedience.

2. Be careful not to mistake immaturity for foolishness. Immaturity is not knowing any better. If both my 7-yr old and 1-yr old make a mess during dinner, surely my 7-or old will get disciplined. But my 1-yr old is still too immature to have a mess-free meal.

3. The first few years are the telling stage. This is the time when you establish most of the rules and boundaries. Be patient to remind them. “Do not touch, do not hit, do not bite, do not eat the goldfish…”

Click here for Part 3 of Discipline Myths.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

11 comments to discipline myths part 2

  • Liz  says:

    Do not eat the goldfish, haha!

    Great blog, Ate Jenn! I like what you said about consistently praising them and reinforcing obedience.

    Janina is adorable in that picture :)

  • JEREMY  says:

    Immaturity vs. foolishness…excellent point!

  • DISCIPLINE MYTHS part 3  says:

    [...] DISCIPLINE MYTHS part 2 [...]

  • Honney  says:

    love your blogs about parenting, ate jen! keep ‘em coming!

  • diane  says:

    i’m guilty of the spit-the-vitamins act too…i would spit mine out our jeep window on the way to school =( and it’s funny…it’s not because i wanted to disobey my mom directly (which is why as kids we hide the action in the first place), but you really have this innate desire to get or do what YOU want, regardless of what anyone else says. O_o i’ll probably encounter such incidents with our child in the future, thanks so much for more enlightenment on discipline =) keep them coming, ate jenn! love your blogs =)

  • diane  says:

    i’m guilty of the spit-the-vitamins act too…i would spit mine out our jeep window on the way to school =( and it’s funny…it’s not because i wanted to disobey my mom directly (which is why as kids we hide the action in the first place), but you really have this innate desire to get or do what YOU want, regardless of what anyone else says. O_o i’ll probably encounter such incidents with our child in the future, thanks so much for more enlightenment on discipline =D

    • Jenn  says:

      diane, it’s gonna be one exciting ride for you, gabe and your baby!!

  • Cyrene  says:

    Jen,
    I’m always reading your blogs. Great help for a new mom like me. How did you deal with Janina? my son is just 14months but he use his cutesness whenever i’m correcting him. He just smile at me but still persistent in doing his own way.

    • Jenn  says:

      cyrene, i know what you mean. it is just so hard to be serious when your child uses his cuteness to make you smile. you just really have to be consistent with your discipline and show your child that his cuteness will not get him off the hook. remember, discipline is for his own good. thanks for reading my blogs!! take care!

  • diane  says:

    hi ate jenn! re-reading the old blog entries on discipline. i guess seeing Raph grow so fast (can’t believe he’s almost 6 months!!!) i figured gabe and i better get a headstart. even now i can sense his personality coming through now that he’s no longer an infant…he gets impatient, annoyed, and sometimes he KNOWS he’s not supposed to do something yet he does it with an indignant “Oooaaahhh!!” hahaha. it’s cute NOW but i know that should not be the case in the very near future!

    Thank you for recommending Shepherding a Child’s Heart. I will try to find a copy and get on started :)

  • DISCIPLINE MYTHS  says:

    [...] here for part 2 of Discipline Myths. Posted in parenting | Tags: abuse, correction, discipline, [...]

Leave a reply

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>